Chris Brown Talks About Losing His Virginity At 8, Growing Up Too Fast In The Music Industry & New Album ‘X’

Chris Brown

R&B/Pop singer Chris Brown recently did an interview with UK-based site the Guardian. The Grammy Award winning multi-platinum artist spoke to writer Decca Aitkenhead at a recording studio in Los Angeles and gave a candid interview. Breezy revealed that he indeed grew up in the public eyes too fast; losing his virginity at 8-year-old and his career plans after he releases his new album, X this November. Below are some highlights:

[Side Note]: I ONLY included the positive highlights because the writer focused too much on the negative side of Chris Brown and tried to agitate him. 

On defining himself, who he is and what he does:

Well, I would say I’m an inspirational guidelines book. You can take my life story or scenarios or songs and relate to them, and apply them to your everyday life. You know, whether it be personal or musical, I just think I’m a walking art piece, just a ball of creativity.”

On losing his virginity at 8 to a 15-year-old girl:

“Yeah, really. Uh-huh.” He grins and chuckles. “It’s different in the country.” Brown grew up with a great gang of boy cousins, and they watched so much porn that he was raring to go. “By that point, we were already kind of like hot to trot, you know what I’m saying? Like, girls, we weren’t afraid to talk to them; I wasn’t afraid. So, at eight, being able to do it, it kind of preps you for the long run, so you can be a beast at it. You can be the best at it.” (Now 24, he doesn’t want to say how many women he’s slept with: “But you know how Prince had a lot of girls back in the day? Prince was, like, the guy. I’m just that, today. But most women won’t have any complaints if they’ve been with me. They can’t really complain. It’s all good.”)

On his image from when he first came out to now:

 “The only thing that’s probably changed for me is just the facial hair a little bit. When I first came out, it was more of a young, warm, clean look. Very clean, very Disney.”

On growing up too fast in the public eyes and does he regret fame coming early:

Honestly, where I’m from, probably not. I think me being able to travel from the small town I was from, me already having a good IQ, and you know being intelligent, and regular stuff, I just had to learn more and more of the street life, you know, how to manoeuvre around a room full of wolves.”

On dealing with the naysayers:

You know, whether it be naysayers, people that won’t say, ‘Hey, I like that.’ But as far as me being young, like, I don’t regret it, I love it, being able to accomplish my dreams at an early age. That’s just showing the kids that’s coming up in sixth or seventh grade, I can do this. If I really stick to it, I can do it. ‘Chris was my age when he did it.'”

Photos Credits: Patrick Fraser for the Guardian

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NEXT PAGE: MORE HIGHLIGHTS FROM CHRIS BROWN’S INTERVIEW WITH THE GUARDIAN

On advice he’d give his 14-year-old self now:

Pay attention to details, details, details. I’m 24 now, so I’m making sure I’m on top of it, but back then I was just, like, whatever we’re doing, I’m just glad to be here, you know?

On being treated unfairly by the D.A. and lashing out on them via social networking sites:

But that’s not a compromise! Community service, that shit is a bitch. I’ll be honest – and you can quote me on that – that is a motherfucker there. For me, I think it’s more of a power trip for the DA. I can speak freely now, because I don’t really care what they say about it, but as far as, like, the 1,000 extra hours they gave me, that’s totally fricking bananas.”

They want me to be the example. Young black kids don’t have the fairer chances. You can see Lindsay Lohan in and out of court every day, you see Charlie Sheen, whoever else, do what they want to do. There hasn’t been any incident that I started since I got on probation, even with the Frank Ocean fight, the Drake situation, all those were defence modes. People think I just walk around as the aggressor, this mad black guy, this angry, young, troubled kid, but I’m not. I’m more and more laid-back. It’s just that people know if they push a button, it’ll make more news than their music. Attaching themselves to me, good or bad, will benefit them.”

On how his Anger Management classes helped him cater woman’s needs:

I think the actual class I went to was a little bit sexist. It was beneficial because it made me cater more to a woman’s thoughts and a woman’s needs, and how to handle situations. But the class itself, no disrespect to the class, but the class itself only tells you you’re wrong, you’re wrong, you’re wrong.”

On his album selling ambitions: 

To sell ground-breaking numbers on an album. Just to be able to have that moment to say, I did it. So as like, I have a stamp. I would really like to mean something to the world, instead of me just being this fungus.” Hang on a minute: fungus? “Yeah, like the decay of society. I don’t want to be the decay of society, I’d like to be the uplifting part.”

On his new album, X:

So this album, creative-wise, is just musically sound, diverse, a lot of different genres attached themselves to the song, like, different fans. It doesn’t have to be necessarily a song for one race, it’s mostly for everybody. Just when you take those journeys through the X album, I mean, you start looking at certain songs, you’d be like, ‘Oh, I get that, I can relate to this song’ or, ‘Oh, I like this song. This sounds good.’ With this album I think it can just identify with any age group, with any race, with any culture.”

X might be Breezy’s last album because people tend to buy singles more than albums:

You can blame it on downloads, but the numbers are what they are. After this, maybe I’ll release a single every few months, or release a song; you’re still going to hear my music and videos.” His single sales still run into millions, he says, adding crossly, “But people won’t bring that up because of the album sales.”

You can read the interview/feature in its entirety at the Guardian.

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One response to “Chris Brown Talks About Losing His Virginity At 8, Growing Up Too Fast In The Music Industry & New Album ‘X’

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